To the editor,

A recent writer, in a letter erroneously comparing Critical Race Theory to Marxism, bemoaned the brainwashing of Americans while touting Tucker Carlson and Newsmax as reliable sources of information. The irony is almost too much for words. 

Critical Race Theory (CRT), in brief, contends that racism is ingrained in the basic structure of our society. An example of structural racism is the current onslaught of restrictive voting laws being put in place in many states. These laws, while neutral in language, intentionally cause disproportionate harm to the ability of minority groups to exercise their most basic right to vote. The authors of these laws disingenuously claim a need to fix ‘wide spread voter fraud,’ a problem analysis after analysis has shown doesn’t exist. CRT advocates careful deconstructive analysis to identify such racist policies and laws, as well as active remedies rather than simply papering over them with platitudes about ‘color blindness’ and so forth. 

While a reasonable person may disagree with some of the ideas/tenets of CRT, demanding it not be taught in any way in our schools (can it not even be discussed?) smacks of the ‘cancel culture’ so many conservatives complain of. Facing the true extent of racism in our society and working towards addressing it is an ongoing, messy, and difficult process. CRT is one of several valid approaches whose merits and drawbacks can and should be discussed in our schools and in public discourse. 

Ken Vaselaar

Cambridge

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.